Modern Dyslexia

Technology is now a part of life. And it’s advancing really quickly, too – to the point where people feel as though they can’t keep up.

Image from Scott McLeod on Flickr

I have a theory on this … We’re not meant to develop this quickly. Evolution is a process that takes hundreds to thousands of years. We’re just not able to process change at such a rapid rate. As a result, we’re losing a few critical skills.

Image from knezeves on Flickr

One of the many skills that are being lost is the ability to look up words in a dictionary. This goes hand in hand with being able to spell. Between auto-correct, dictionary.com and Leet, most people under the age of 30 have no idea how to open a dictionary, let alone find a word. On the up side, dictionaries are still tools, but now they are primarily used to kill spiders.

It’s a beautiful thing – by greeblie on Flickr

And while I am on the topic of words, when last did you write someone a letter? I am not talking about the 50 emails you sent today and your ability to type 80wpm. When last did you take out a pen and a piece of paper (maybe use a little cologne or perfume to scent it slightly). Waterman pens are still in business, you can still buy luxurious silk writing paper, but I haven’t received a handwritten letter since I dated a hippy.

Photo by staralee on Flickr

My handwriting is shocking. When people ask me to sign a card, I find an imaginary urgent meeting to attend. I can barely write my own name anymore and deciphering my notes from class/meetings makes me see the value of an iPad.

With the rise and rise of technology, there seems to be a rise of a sub-form of dyslexia. And even though I take words really seriously, I too am a victim of the blight. I don’t think anyone can safely say that she is not. And it’s a pity, because somewhere, in a box that cannot retrieve information for me, I still have my first love letter.

Advertisements
Modern Dyslexia